Norwegian court rejects request for parole of mass murderer Breivik News


Anders Breivik, an anti-Muslim neo-Nazi, killed 77 people in Norway’s worst peaceful atrocity in July 2011.

A Norwegian court ruled on Tuesday that far-right attacker Anders Bering Breivik, who killed 77 people in 2011, should remain in prison, saying there remained an “obvious risk” that he would return to the behavior that led to the massacre.

Breivik, an anti-Muslim neo-Nazi, killed 77 people in Norway’s worst peaceful atrocity in July 2011.

Last month, Breivik faced a three-judge telemark hearing for early release before Telemark District Court, where he professed white views and shone Nazi salutes on the opening day of the hearing, while claiming he had renounced violence.

However, the court said he remained a potential threat, saying Breivik could not believe his words when he said he would no longer commit acts of violence.

The mass murderer Anders Bering BreivikBreivik is serving a maximum 21-year sentence for Norway for detonating a bomb in Oslo’s government district and carrying out a massacre at a summer camp for left-wing youth activists [File: Ole Berg-Rusten/NTB/via Reuters]

“The risk of violence is real and significant and is equal to what it was when (Breivik) was first convicted,” the district court said in a unanimous verdict.

“His assurances and honesty are of little value, even if he has to keep in mind what he says the moment he says it,” the judges wrote.

Based on the court’s findings, it is unlikely that Breivik will be able to adjust to life outside prison at this time, and the risk of recidivism is significant, the judges wrote.

“Very dangerous man”

Breivik is serving a maximum of 21 years in Norway for detonating a bomb in Oslo’s government district and carrying out a massacre at a summer camp for left-wing youth activists.

He was declared sane in the trial against him, although the prosecution claims he is a psychopath.

He did not appeal his sentence, but unsuccessfully sued the government for human rights abuses, denying him the right to associate with supporters.

Breivik could be detained for more than 21 years under a provision that allows authorities to keep criminals in prison for as long as they consider a threat to society.

During a hearing last month, prosecutor Hulda Karlsdottir said Breivik was still “a very dangerous man” and “did not show any real remorse in court.”

The Norwegian news agency NTB quoted Karlsdottir as welcoming the decision as “well-founded”.

A psychiatrist who has been monitoring him since 2012 testified that Breivik could not be trusted, while a prison official told the hearing that “there is an immediate danger” that if released, Breivik will commit serious crimes again.

Breivik’s lawyer, Oystein Storvik, said his client had to be released to prove he was reformed and no longer a threat to society, and that could not be proven while in complete isolation.

Storvik called it a “paradox that a person is treated so badly in prison that he never gets better.” He never goes out. “

Tuesday’s decision can be appealed. Norwegian TV2 quoted Storvik as saying that Breivik would appeal the decision. The lawyer was not immediately available for comment.





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